Lifestyle

Can Dogs Eat Bananas?

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to nourishing your dog. Each pet parent has their own belief system and methodology that works for them. Most vets encourage people toward the nutritious, high-grade pet-specific lines of foods on the market because the ingredients cater to the animal’s health and well-being.

But some parents put a lot of time, effort (and research) into making homemade food using fruits and vegetables, also meant to benefit wellness with superior vet exam results.

If you opt to take matters into your own hands, you need to learn what the dog can consume without harm, like can dogs eat bananas given the sugar content? Although the sugar content in fruits is natural, it’s still something you need to keep to a minimum for pup.

Bananas are high in sugar and carbohydrates, meaning your canine can put on the pounds if they indulge a little too much. Exercise is not enough to keep puppies at a healthy weight if they’re indulging in foods that counteract the activity.

Can Dogs Eat Bananas?

Dogs eat anything they can get their paws on. It’s up to pet parents to keep a handle on the diet to maintain a sense of wellness and health. Fruits and vegetables are often incorporated into a canine’s diet, in some cases as a replacement in the way of homemade dog food.

Some things need adding in moderation, with bananas being one of those fruits you want to monitor. Go here to learn what fruits and vegetables are okay for pets. While there are many benefits for this fruit, it’s also a high-sugar option (sucrose, glucose, fructose) and loaded with carbohydrates.

That means added pounds for a pup who overindulges. Instead, give the berry (yes, a banana falls under the classification of berries) as a special treat. In doing so puppy will gain the following benefits:

  • Exceptional Fiber Counts: The fiber content is outstanding in this fruit. Many dogs suffer from gastrointestinal issues. Serving a tiny bit of banana every so often has the potential to maintain gastrointestinal health, preventing possible problems or helping to resolve those the pup might be enduring.

If your canine suffers from bouts of diarrhea or other bowel disorder symptoms (aside from visiting with the vet), allowing him to indulge in a little of the mashed fruit might give some relief.

  • Magnesium: The ingredient promotes protein building with the facilitation of transported energy for active canines, also promoting the growth of healthy bones. It’s essential to make sure you keep your dog physically (and mentally) stimulated at every age.

The pup needs to have adequate playtime as well as daily walks. The times might decrease as age progresses and energy levels lower, but you should never stop or risk puppy stiffening and developing joint issues.

  • Vitamin C: The immune system likes a jolt of the antioxidant that vitamin C offers, not to mention the capacity for aiding with cartilage building and cell protection.
  • Potassium: Potassium is a key ingredient in the fruit for which the fruit is famous due to its high level. The important electrolyte maintains body fluid to the optimum level. Potassium is also responsible for the adequate functioning of blood vessels and the development of muscles.

Ideally, you want to keep the serving to approximately two small pieces for a toy / small breed, and the larger or medium-sized dog breeds no more than half of a standard size banana. If you have an animal that engages in extraordinary amounts of activity daily, burning many calories, you could offer more, but even then, safety and wellness are the priorities. Find out if dogs should eat fruit at https://tails.com/blog/2018/05/24/can-dogs-eat-fruit/.

Final Thought

“Will a dog eat a banana” and “can a dog eat the treat” are two different questions. A dog loves the smell of the highly sweet treat and will gobble it down if given a choice. Should you provide it to the canine? It’s not a bad thing but needs doing in minimal quantities.

If a dog overindulges, elevated levels of potassium can result in symptoms of vomiting/diarrhea, weakness, and discomfort, and the carbohydrates and sugar can fatten up even an energetic pup.

If you think your puppy got into a bunch without your knowledge or is consuming too much, a call to the vet is warranted, especially if the animal shows some symptoms, as mentioned. Keep these and other human products out of the pup’s reach so only you have access and can monitor the amount given to keep the puppy safe and to maintain his well-being.

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